Speakers

Chih-Chang (C.C.) Chu, PhD

Rebecca Q. Morgan '60 Professor, Fiber Science Program, Dept. of Textiles and Apparel; Biomedical Engineering Program, Cornell University

C.C. Chu, PhD

Chih-Chang (C.C.) Chu, PhD, joined the Cornell faculty in 1978 as an assistant professor after completing his postdoctoral research on biomaterials at the University of Alabama Medical Center, in Birmingham. He earned his doctorate in polymer science under the late Prof. Leo Mandelkern at Florida State University. He currently teaches both graduate and undergraduate courses at Cornell, including the newly introduced, “Biomaterials and Medical Devices for Human Body Repair,” or “Human Spare Parts” course. Chu is the first recipient of the endowed Rebecca Q. Morgan ’60 chaired professor at Cornell University, and the recipient of the State University of New York Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities (May 2009). He is a guest professor at the Chang-Chun Institute of Applied Chemistry, of the Chinese Academy of Science. He was also was very recently (March 2014) inducted into the prestigious College of Fellows at the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences—an honor reserved for the top 2% of bioengineers worldwide.

Among his many functions, Chu has served on research grant councils and committees, and on the editorial boards of several biomaterial and bioengineering journals. He has published 191 research papers; is a recipient of 75 U.S. and international patents (with 30 more pending); and is an editor and author of the book, Wound Closure Biomaterials and Devices, published by CRC Press. His work has focused on the multidisciplinary study of new novel biodegradable polymers, fibers and fibrous membranes for human body repair. His efforts in the last 10 years have largely focused on the design, synthesis and evaluation of a novel family of biologically active biodegradable polymers that are as-yet commercially unavailable. These polymers have been engineered in various forms and shapes for applications including surgical repair of tissues, tissue regeneration, drug-eluting stents, burn treatment, wound closure and drug control/release purposes. One of Chu’s new inventions, "Biodegradable, Bioactive and Programmable Hydrogels," was chosen as a semifinalist for the Christopher Columbus Awards.

Session:

Monday, June 22

John Hayes, PhD

Professor, Sensory Science, and Director, Sensory Evaluation Center, Pennsylvania State University

John Hayes, PhD

John Hayes, PhD, is a faculty member at the Pennsylvania State University, where he teaches sensory science and is the director of the Sensory Evaluation Center. He earned his bachelor and masters degrees in Food Science from Cornell University, and his doctorate in nutrition from the University of Connecticut before completing a National Research Service Award (NIH T32) postdoctoral fellowship in behavioral genetics and alcohol addiction at Brown University.

Hayes runs a multifaceted research program that applies sensory science methods to a diverse range of problems. These include work on chemosensation and ingestive behavior, as well as optimizing a novel vaginal drug delivery system for HIV prevention in women. He has authored more than 55 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, and his work has appeared on CNN.com, in the Huffington Post, Wall Street Journal, The Guardian (UK), Popular Science and Vogue, among others. Hayes has won multiple international awards, including the Pangborn Sensory Science Scholarship, and the Ajinomoto Award from the Association for Chemoreception Sciences (AChemS). He regularly reviews articles for the Journal of Food Science and serves on the editorial boards of Chemosensory Perception and the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture.

Session:

Monday, June 22

Alexander Richter

PhD Candidate, Velev Group, Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University

Alexander Richter

Alexander Richter is a chemical engineering PhD candidate at North Carolina State University. He earned his B.S. in Environmental/Biotechnology Engineering with an emphasis on Environmental Engineering at MCI University—The Entrepreneurial School, Austria, in 2009. He received his M.S. in Chemical Engineering from North Carolina State University in 2012, where he is currently pursuing his PhD.

Richter was selected as one of seven graduate finalists in the 2013 Collegiate Inventors Competition. Advised by Orlin Velev, PhD, INVISTA Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Richter was nominated for his project, “Silver Nanoparticles Without Metal: A New Generation of Environmentally Benign Antimicrobials.” His project focused on functionalizing biopolymer nanoparticles with silver to kill drug-resistant bacteria, fungi and viruses, and to be used as antimicrobials. Further, his work aims to assist in replacing non-biodegradable nanosystems with environmentally benign, biopolymer-based ones. Built from lignin and cellulose, his group's nanoparticle technologies are biodegradable, environmentally benign, and may potentially be employed as foam and emulsion stabilizers; as drug delivery systems; and as matrices for environmental remediation systems.

Session:

Monday, June 22

Moderators

All exhibitors, sessions, presenters, times and locations are subject to change without notice.